Good evening and welcome to The British Deer Society

news & events

06 June 2019

Pregnant Deer Dies After Getting Trapped in Goal Net

A pregnant deer has died after its head became trapped in the netting of some goalposts at Henderson Sport and Social Club, Harold Hill, Romford.

Pregnant deer dies in net

A group of local residents rushed to the doe’s aid after a walker discovered her and cut the net from around her neck but the deer had sadly passed away.

Jan and Shantel Louise, from local volunteer group Harold Hill Deer Aid, as well as Lorraine Stevens, contacted a vet who came to help them perform an emergency caesarian in an attempt to rescue the fawn, but sadly the fawn had already died as well.

03 June 2019

Staten Island’s Deer Vasectomy Scheme Having Little Impact

After three years and a cost of $4.1 million deer vasectomies have trimmed Staten Island’s by a total of 316 animals.

Staten Island’s $4.1M deer vasectomy scheme

This means US taxpayers have spent $12,975 a head to shave 15% off the huge herd.

The city hired White Buffalo in 2016 to run the world’s first attempt to curb deer by sterilizing only males, as the borough’s herd increased to a high of 2,053 in 2017—an 8,454% increase in less than a decade.

31 May 2019

Farmers Urged to Check for Young Deer

At this time of year, many farmers will be harvesting silage, but unfortunately, it's not uncommon for young deer to be killed in the process. 

Farmers Urged to Check for Young Deer

It is normal for a mother to leave a young hidden because it cannot keep up with her when she is feeding and our standard advice is to leave them well alone. However, if they are hidden in a farmers field this can be extremely dangerous. We urge farmers to check for young hidden in the field before harvesting and move these to a safe place.

A popular method is to walk the area with a dog before harvesting. Thankfully we know many farmers do this, but as the young deer are often well hidden with little or no scent they can be extremely difficult to spot. A few years ago a couple of wild game managers from Germany came up with a possible solution to the problem.