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ABOUT THE PROJECT

The project’s main purpose is to evaluate the effects of management-relevant levels of anthropogenic disturbance on resource use and environmental impact of red deer.

We hypothesise that:

1) Tourism-related disturbance may alter habitat usage, time budgets and consequently foraging intensity of red deer.

2) Red deer maintain biodiverse short-sward grassland habitats which are refuges and breeding grounds for rare Lepidoptera species, more effectively than sheep.

3) Regular anthropogenic disturbances decrease the grazing intensity of red deer and, as such a less intensive grazing regime conducive for promoting suitable breeding habitat for rare Lepidoptera species can be established.

This work constitutes a PhD project. Expected outputs are a PhD thesis, several presentations at national and international conferences, a series of papers published in the peer-reviewed and popular literature, and information to help the owners of the Isle of Ulva decide on the future management of red deer and their habitat on the island

FURTHER READING

Red stag Autum crossing the road with car approaching Scottish Highlands by Coatesy

Driving Deer Aware – Top Tips To Help Avoid a Collision

We are now in one of the peak periods for deer vehicle collisions not only in the UK but across the northern hemisphere. A combination of factors, not least this time of year is the rutting season for many of our deer species, makes this a particularly high-risk time, from now right through to December.

Rural Women - Rhian Tyne

Rural Women – Rhian’s Story

Rhian Tyne is a 19-year-old lady deer stalker and BDS youth ambassador. She has a determination and passion for deer management that is truly impressive and a love for the countryside that is infectious.

Find out more about her experiences in her story.

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