Good evening and welcome to The British Deer Society

News archive

04 April 2019

Wednesday Walkers Group Saves Deer

The Henley Standard reported that a group of walkers has rescued a deer on land near Henley Park.

The deer was caught in double-stranded barbed wire and again highlights the dangers to deer of fencing hazards.

Mick Martin, one of the five walkers, said:

“As we were coming down on to the Mount we heard some squealing and saw the deer hanging on the fence.

It must have run out of the wood, tried to leap the fence and caught its feet on the top. It was hanging from its hind legs.”

The walkers approached the deer but it tried to escape, so Mr Martin grabbed hold of it and lifted it up to take the weight while two others untangled it.

“We had to bring it over the fence so it twisted the wire back to the right angle. The leg came out and the deer ran away. There was nothing broken but it had a few cuts from the wire.”

Walkers save deer

04 April 2019

Baby Deer Mauled by Dog

The Courier has reported (5th April 2019) that a baby deer had to be euthanized after being mauled by an out of control dog in Fife. 

A dog walker discovered the deer with two broken legs n woodland near Lochore Meadows.

The Scottish SPCA were called but sadly the animal had to be put to sleep to prevent further suffering from its extensive injuries.

Scottish SPCA animal rescue officer Ian Burlinson also issued a reminder to dog owners to keep their animals under control.

He said:

“We were sadly called to Lochore Meadows on Tuesday morning after a young deer was attacked by a dog.

“The deer had a badly injured back end and was sadly put to sleep to prevent further suffering.

“Incidents like this prove as a sad yet important reminder as to why dog owners have a responsibility to keep their dog under control at all times, especially when there are other animals around.”

28 March 2019

Scottish nature photography award winners

A summer spent photographing a family of roe deer has earned an Edinburgh man the Scottish Nature Photographer of the Year 2018 award.

Phil Johnston's winning image, Roe Kid Flower, was taken near his home.

He said: "I love nothing more than being out in the sticks with my camera, seeing all the beauty that surrounds me and trying my best to capture those moments in time.

"On this particular evening in early July, I had already spent several hours with the roe family but I had also seen a fox around.

Phil Johnston's winning image of a young roe deer

28 March 2019

Independent Irish Politician Wants Army Called in to Manage Deer

The Express reported on Thursday that Independent Irish politician Danny Healy-Rae had asked the Irish legislature to call in the army in response to the problems being caused by wild deer in Kerry in South West Ireland.

Mr Healy-Rae said:

"The deer are entering towns and villages, and estates around Killarney, and they have taken the place over.”

The politician sighted incidents of serious car accidents coupled with a problem with the attitude of the national park to deer management.

Deer Problem in Kerry

In response, Josepha Madigan, Ireland’s Heritage Minister, said there was a deer management programme in place for Killarney National Park and that a cull was currently being done.

21 March 2019

Defra Bovine TB badger cull and vaccination information update

DEFRA have released the latest UK results and information on the Bovine TB badger cull and vaccination covering 2018.

Results of 2018 supplementary badger culls:
Supplementary badger culling took place between June 2018 and January 2019 in Gloucestershire and Somerset.
The results of these operations can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/bovine-tb-summary-of-badger-control-monitoring-during-2018

21 March 2019

BDS Chairman Speaking at BASC Wales Open Evening

The British Deer Society chairman Professor Rory Putman will be speaking this month at the BASC Wales open evening on 28th March 2019.

The event is at The Royal Oak Hotel in Welshpool between 7 pm and 10 pm and features four speakers with each guest speaker giving a short presentation before welcoming questions from the floor.

Speakers

Ian Bell – Chief executive – The British Association for Shooting and Conservation
Professor Rory Putman – Chairman – The British Deer Society
Martyn Jones – Council member – The British Association for Shooting and Conservation
John Thornley OBE– Council member – The British Association for Shooting and Conservation


Source:https://www.royaloakwelshpool.co.uk 

20 March 2019

Plant Daffodils and Daphnes to Stave Off Deer

The Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) has announced the findings from their new research on how to avoid deer damage in your garden.

Apparently, if you want to avoid deer eating your garden plants, swapping your geraniums for jasmine could be the answer. The RHS recently surveyed its members to understand which deer were most prevalent in gardens and their preferred plants for feeding on.

Members reported that roe deer were the most commonly sighted (65%), followed by Reeves’ muntjac (41%) and fallow deer (9%) and of the 185 popular plant species investigated they found deer were particularly fond of tulips, roses, and holly.

However, 85 plants were found to be less popular with deer and were defined as having less than a 20% chance of damage - these included Daffodils, Primula and Nerine.

Daffodils

19 March 2019

Indigenous knowledge and conservation management: challenges and opportunities

Free Lecture - Tuesday 9 April, 6.00-7.45pm
Huxley Lecture Theatre, Zoological Society of London, ZSL London Zoo

There is huge scope to integrate indigenous knowledge into conservation management. Find out what are the challenges, limitations, and future scope for building this unique body of knowledge into biodiversity conservation?


Source: https://www.zsl.org/science/whats-on/indigenous-knowledge-and-conservation-management-challenges-and-opportunities